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Noncommunicable disease (NCD) and risk factors

Comparative study of risk factors for diabetes type-2 and cardiovascular disease among Somali population in Horn of Africa and Somali immigrants in Norway and other relevant populations.

About the project

We do not have sufficient knowledge about the prevalence or risk factors for diabetes and CVD among the Somali population, neither in their original countries, nor among Somali immigrants in Western countries. This project is a cross-sectional study, with the main objective to assess the prevalence of risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the Somali population, in Oslo, Norway, and in Hargeisa, Somaliland. The project will provide good baseline data on risk factors of various risk factors for lifestyle diseases in this population.

The program composes currently of three parts:

  1. Oslo Somali study
  2. Somaliland study
  3. Comparative study of risk factors of NCD’s in Somalis and Burmese (Myanmar)

Objectives

The main objective is to assess the prevalence of risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease and to improve knowledge of diet and other lifestyle habits among Somalis. We have also additional research questions in the respective studies.

Outcomes

The Oslo Somali study started in December 2015 and the Somaliland study will start in February 2016. The comparative part will take place after the data analysis.

Background

According to the WHO, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are leading causes of death and disability worldwide. An estimated 17.5 million people died from CVDs in 2012, representing 31% of all global deaths. Over three quarters of CVD deaths take place in low and middle income countries. Projections from the Global Burden of Disease Project suggest that from 1990 to 2020, the burden of CVD faced by particularly African countries will double. In 2015 there were about 428,000 non-Western immigrants and their descendants in Norway. Demographic changes as a result of an increased proportion of immigrants in the population can lead to major health challenges.

The findings from this program will provide a good baseline data on risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease and will contribute knowledge about the prevalence of various risk factors for lifestyle diseases in the Somali population. Furthermore, this will provide a good basis to initiate appropriate and effective preventive measures for the population. This will also provide opportunities to compare the health status of Somali population in Horn of Africa and Somali immigrants in the West countries and to other relevant populations.

Sub-projects

  • Monitoring population sodium intake using 24-hour urine collection in collaboration with Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Financing

  • Norwegian Directorate of Health
  • Norwegian Institute of Public Health
  • The Institute of Health and Society, UiO

Cooperation

  • Norwegian Institute of Public Health
  • Faculty of medicine, University of Hargeisa
  • Sagene district, Oslo municipality

Start - finish

2015-2018

Tags: Global South
Published Jan. 18, 2016 1:19 PM - Last modified May 31, 2016 3:04 PM