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Vitamin D supplementation

Effect of vitamin D supplementation on muscular strength, musculoskeletal pain and headache in immigrants living in Norway.

Fatty fish such as salmon are dietary sources of vitamin D. Illustration: colourbox.com

About the project

In our previous research we have found that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among immigrants from non-western countries living in Norway. We have also performed intervention studies in order to improve their vitamin D status.

This study will address gender and ethnic differences in the occurrence of disease. The results from the study will give knowledge in the development of specific measures in order to prevent diseases among immigrants, in particular women, who are most vulnerable to these conditions.The findings of the study will also enhance our knowledge of the effects of vitamin D in general, and will be of international interest.

Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in many populations, also in developing countries. Another aspect is that a possible improvement in musculoskeletal function with vitamin D supplementation might increase physical activity and thereby promote regulation of type-2 diabetes and reduce overweight which will then enhance the quality of life of immigrant population, and particularly women.

Objectives

The primary aim of the present trial is to study the effect of daily vitamin D supplementation on muscular power and force among non-western immigrants living in Oslo, Norway, and secondarily to study the effect of musculoskeletal pain and headache.

We have also prespecified a number of additional research questions below, which because of multiple comparisons should be interpreted with caution unless the statistical evidence for an effect is very strong.

Outcomes

The study started in January 2011, and 251 participants have been included by March 2011.

Publications

Background

Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread public health problem among immigrants from non-Western to Europe, including Norway. It is important to have best possible knowledge about health consequences of poor vitamin D status as a background for preventive strategies, but the current knowledge in this field is limited.

The study is a randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial which compares two doses of vitamin D supplements with placebo and the tablets will be taken daily in a period of 16 weeks.

The study will also address gender and ethnic differences and the results from the study will give knowledge in the development of specific measures in order to improve health among immigrants. The findings of the study will also enhance our knowledge of the effects of vitamin D in general, and will be of international interest. It should be added that vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in many populations, also in developing countries. Another aspect is that a possible improvement in musculoskeletal function with vitamin D supplementation might increase physical activity which could have many positive health effects.

The project is an interdisciplinary cooperation between researchers at Section of General Practice and Section for Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Oslo, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences. The research group was established in 2009 and consists of professors, senior researchers and research fellow. In order to enhance the project’s quality and build up the competence of the post doctoral candidate we have established a collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK.

Financing

  • Norsk Kvinners Sanitetsforening
  • Institute of Health and Society
  • Nycomed

Cooperation

  • Norwegian School of Sport Sciences
  • Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Start - Finish

2011-2013

Published May 6, 2011 12:52 PM - Last modified Feb. 25, 2015 9:15 AM