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Systems biology in controlled dietary intervention studies

Our primary research focus is investigating the effect of diets and dietary components in particular fatty acids on cardiometabolic phenotypes.

About the group

The group wants to get a comprehensive understanding of the role of diet and dietary fat on biological processes in humans by integrating large scale datasets from controlled dietary intervention studies.

The group uses randomized controlled postprandial and short and long term dietary intervention studies and applies large scale datasets, such as whole genome transcriptome (in peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) and plasma and urine metabolome, to investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of diet and in particular fat quality on cardiometabolic risk markers.

Our goal is to obtain knowledge that can be used for future dietary guidelines, which may be more tailor made for specific subgroups or individuals (personalized nutrition) to prevent lifestyle diseases.

Projects

  1. Marine omega-3 fatty acids and health - use of systems biology in controlled dietary intervention studies (financed by Research Council of Norway). Aim of integrating large scale data sets (transcriptomics and lipidomics) to understand the underlying mechanisms of the health beneficial effects of fish oil on healthy individuals.
     
  2. Effects of fat quality on blood lipids and immune response. Aim of understanding the underlying mechanisms of the health beneficial effects of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat from plant oils on lipids and inflammatory markers, both in circulation and in PBMCs in healthy subjects with moderate hypercholesterolemia.
     
  3. Health effects of Nordic diet (SYSDIET) (financed by Nordforsk). Aim of understanding the underlying mechanisms of the health beneficial effects of the Nordic diet based on the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations on glucose tolerance, lipids and inflammatory markers, both in circulation and PBMCs in subject with metabolic syndrome.
     
  4. Health effects of krill oil, lean and fatty fish. Aim of understanding the underlying mechanisms of the health beneficial effects of long chain omega-3 fatty acids from either krill oil or lean and fatty fish in healthy subjects with moderate hypertriglyceridemia.
     
  5. Postprandial effects of existing and new innovative dairy products (financed by Research Council of Norway). Aim of understanding the underlying mechanisms of fat intake from different sources of dairy products on lipids, inflammation and satiety in circulation and PBMCs in healthy lean and overweight subjects.
     
  6. NordFOOD, a Nordic training network (financed by Nordplus Horizontal)

Long-term objectives

  • Prevent chronic diseases in the population by providing evidence based knowledge of the role of diet and fat quality on cardiometabolic health.
  • Increase the understanding of how fat quality influences metabolic pathways and homeostasis, by studying how fat intake regulates the transcriptome and metabolome and how this regulation is disturbed in cardiometabolic diseases.
  • Apply integrated large-scale data (transcriptomics and metabolomics) and cardiometabolic risk markers from postprandial and long term controlled dietary intervention studies and make molecular profiles.
  • Establish molecular profiles that are regulated by fatty acids and may lead to different fat intake guidelines among different age groups and at the individual level.
  • Apply both prospective and retrospective SNP genotyping and advanced sequencing technology to understand to what extent individual genotypes contribute to the dietary response.

Cooperation

The most important synergy is to apply omics-based technologies (chemistry, genetics and molecular biology) and data integration (bioinformatics), in controlled dietary intervention studies in order to prevent cardiometabolic disorders (clinical nutrition and medicine). This will give us the possibility to analyze simultaneously thousands of molecules and parameters from controlled dietary intervention studies. These results will give us a deeper understanding of dynamic changes in molecular components and biological pathways across health and disease in groups of individuals, and even within an individual.

The group collaborates with internal research groups at the Department of Nutrition and external partners.

The most important collaborators are:

Professor Kirsten B. Holven in the field of clinical nutrition, diet, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and dietary intervention studies at Department of Nutrition, UiO, and Professor Lene F. Andersen in the field of nutrition epidemiology, Department of Nutrition, UiO.

The group is partner of a Nordic Center of Excellence in food, nutrition and health called Systems biology in controlled dietary interventions and cohort studies (SYSDIET) and collaborate in particular with Professor Carsten Carlberg, dr. Marjukka Kolehmainen, dr. Jussi Paananen and dr. Vanessa de Mello at the University of Eastern Finland, and Professor Lars O Dragsted at the University of Copenhagen, dr. Ingrid Dahlman at Karolinska Institute in the field of clinical nutrition, dietary intervention studies, medicine, chemistry, molecular biology and bioinformatics.

In bioinformatics and statistics, the group  collaborate with Professor Magne Thoresen at UiO, Professor Achim Kohler at NMBU, dr. Larry Parnell at Tuft University, Boston, dr. Einar Ryeng at NTNU and dr. Ole Kristoffer Olstad at OUS.

Resources

Published Feb. 5, 2016 2:04 PM - Last modified Dec. 16, 2016 12:48 PM