Omics technology in nutritional epidemiology

We aim to identify and evaluate novel biomarkers of dietary patterns and specific foods by combining omics technology.

About the project

Diet is one of the key factors that is particularly involved in the pathogenesis and progression of non-communicable diseases (NCD), such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and a number of cancers.

The interaction between diet, genetics and risk of NCD has been the focus of international research efforts for decades. However, it is a huge challenge is to measure dietary intake with good accuracy, since no dietary assessment methods can measure dietary intake without error.

Biomarkers of food or nutrient intake measure intake objectively and without the subjective errors self-reporting of intake may introduce, making them more desirable than self-reported methods. However, today there are only a few validated biomarkers of dietary intake, and there is an enormous need for development of novel biomarkers. The primary focus of novel biomarkers should target both dietary patterns and specific foods.

In recent years, studies have utilised metabolomics for the identification of new biomarkers for intake to identify promising biomarkers for e.g. red meat, citrus fruit, vegetables and whole grain. A targeted approach to identify and evaluate more “metabolomic biomarkers” would be of great value. An interesting approach using metabolomics is to study how dietary pattern relates to metabolic profiles, and to identify biomarkers for different dietary patterns. Use of transcriptomics for identifying new objective biomarkers of intake may be another promising approach.

Collaboration

  • Professor Kirsten Holven, PhD, Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Professor Stine Ulven, PhD, Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Professor Magne Thoresen, PhD, Department of Biostatistics, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Professor Eiliv Lund, MD, PhD, Department of community medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway
  • Associate Professor Guri Skeie, PhD, Department of community medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway
Published Mar. 14, 2016 1:58 PM - Last modified Mar. 14, 2016 2:05 PM