Research news

Image of researchers Tor Erik Rusten and Nadja Katheder. Photo: Øystein H. Horgmo, UiO
Published Jan. 25, 2017 9:22 AM

Researchers at the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital have discovered that cancer cells grow by stealing energy from neighbouring cells.

Photo of Britt Nakken and Peter Szodoray
Published Nov. 25, 2016 12:43 PM

Researchers at the Faculty have shown that harmful immune cells are more easily activated in patients suffering from the autoimmune disease lupus than in healthy people.

Chalkboard drawing of the human intestine.
Published Nov. 8, 2016 10:51 AM

Interactions between the gut and the body are central to good health. Researchers at the University of Oslo have now identified one of the key regulators of these interactions.

Transparent head with blue markings for the sceleton and a bright, blue brain.
Published Aug. 24, 2016 2:57 PM

The Neanderthals lacked several of the genes that can lead to schizophrenia. Does this mean that the genes for schizophrenia are linked to what makes the human species so successful?

illustration of immune cells attacking a cell containing cancer mutations
Published May 30, 2016 10:08 AM

The immune defence systems of healthy individuals may become key to future cancer treatment.

Glass bottle with the writing NOPSC in marker next to multi coloured blood sample rack with four test tubes.
Published May 9, 2016 10:40 AM

Can knowledge about one disease help us to find treatment for another disease?

Split image. Left side shows a woman in 19th century dress, with her side to the camera and her back reflecting in a mirror to her side. Right side shows a man sitting in front of a mirror with no shirt on. On the lower right side of his torso a scar is visible.
Published May 6, 2016 3:18 PM

In portraits that could have been made for the living-room wall, photographers cleverly documented wounds that were visible on both sides of the body in one and the same image, using a mirror.

Accumulation of fat in a blood vessel graphically illustrated
Published Apr. 28, 2016 4:41 PM

Together with an international research group, Bente Halvorsen, Professor of Medicine at the University of Oslo, has found a new and effective way to treat hardening of the arteries. The idea came from an unexpected source.

Test tubes in a metallic rack
Published Apr. 13, 2016 1:27 PM

“Oh, you're so hormonal!". We all understand what that means: moody and volatile. But hormones do much more than influence our mood. Without hormones our bodies simply would not function.

Close up of surgeon during operation. An image of the operation reflected in the surgeons glasses.
Published Oct. 27, 2015 2:52 PM

A new and simpler surgical method for the treatment of intestinal perforation is a poorer alternative for patients compared to the old method, researchers at the University of Oslo and Akershus University Hospital find. The study raises important questions about the testing of new surgical methods.

Published Sep. 23, 2015 5:17 PM

Diagnosis of coeliac disease requires a tissue sample from the small intestine, which can be extremely unpleasant. Researchers at the Faculty of Medicine have developed a blood test which provides a rapid, painless answer.

Image of how oxytocin reaches the brain
Published Aug. 24, 2015 4:35 PM

Researchers at UiO have tested a new device for delivering hormone treatments for mental illness through the nose. This method was found to deliver medicine to the brain with few side effects.

Microscopy image of the small intestine mucosa of a patient with active celiac disease
Published June 23, 2015 11:05 AM

Professor Ludvig M. Sollid and his research group found the real cause of coeliac disease. They have now been singled out as one of five world-leading research teams at UiO, and will receive substantial funding for their international work.

Published Apr. 22, 2015 4:18 PM

Nerve fibres, which transmit impulses from neurons, play a key role in the nervous system. Until now, no-one knew how they formed.

Illustration of the putamen within the brain.
Published Mar. 23, 2015 1:21 PM

Researchers have discovered several new gene variants that influence brain volume. We are yet another step closer to finding the causes of a number of psychological disorders.

Image of beta celles from the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. Taken through a microscope. Photo: Oskar Skog, Uppsala University
Published Mar. 23, 2015 1:17 PM

Researchers have discovered that patients with type 1 diabetes can regain the ability to produce insulin. They showed that insulin-producing cells can recover outside the body. 

The dark patches are viral components in the insulin-producing cells in the islets of Langerhans. Photo: DiViD.
Published Dec. 5, 2014 1:51 PM

Researchers have found a virus in the pancreas of patients with type 1 diabetes. The discovery may offer the potential for both treatment and a vaccine.

Published Oct. 3, 2013 12:38 PM

Nobody can afford to wait for almost a year for a vaccine once a deadly influenza virus is on its way. The salvation may now have arrived:  a vaccine produced in a couple of weeks – and perhaps even completely free of side-effects.

Published June 13, 2013 10:33 PM

Sugar molecules in the body play a far more important part in the development of breast cancer than was previously believed.

Published May 15, 2013 1:15 PM

Researchers at Oslo University have identified nine new genetic loci that are important in the development of a serious liver disease.

Published Jan. 25, 2013 10:55 AM

Patients recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis have low bone density and thus an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

Published Sep. 25, 2012 1:10 PM

Palliative care must be provided to patients with neurological disorders just as naturally as it is offered to cancer patients, according to neurologist.

Published July 16, 2012 12:57 PM

A young, 30-year-old man contracts cancer of the colon. The prognosis looks grim. In the future, researchers will perhaps be able to predict the population that is at risk of developing colorectal cancer – and prevent it.

Published June 25, 2012 12:29 PM

A damaged cornea is one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. But now there is a cure.

Published June 11, 2012 1:12 PM

What if heroin users no longer experienced any euphoric effects from heroin?