Publications

  • In Vivo Amygdala Nuclei Volumes in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders.
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    In Vivo Amygdala Nuclei Volumes in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders.

    Schizophr Bull. 2021 Jan 22;:

    Authors: Barth C, Nerland S, de Lange AG, Wortinger LA, Hilland E, Andreassen OA, Jørgensen KN, Agartz I

    Abstract Abnormalities in amygdala volume are well-established in schizophrenia and commonly reported in bipolar disorders. However, the specificity of volumetric differences in individual amygdala nuclei is largely unknown. Patients with schizophrenia disorders (SCZ, N = 452, mean age 30.7 ± 9.2 [SD] years, females 44.4%), bipolar disorders (BP, N = 316, 33.7 ± 11.4, 58.5%), and healthy controls (N = 753, 34.1 ± 9.1, 40.9%) underwent T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Total amygdala, nuclei, and intracranial volume (ICV) were estimated with Freesurfer (v6.0.0). Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression models, adjusting for age, age2, ICV, and sex, were fitted to examine diagnostic group and subgroup differences in volume, respectively. Bilateral total amygdala and all nuclei volumes, except the medial and central nuclei, were significantly smaller in patients relative to controls. The largest effect sizes were found for the basal nucleus, accessory basal nucleus, and cortico-amygdaloid transition area (partial η2 > 0.02). The diagnostic subgroup analysis showed that reductions in amygdala nuclei volume were most widespread in schizophrenia, with the lateral, cortical, paralaminar, and central nuclei being solely reduced in this disorder. The right accessory basal nucleus was marginally smaller in SCZ relative to BP (t = 2.32, P = .05). Our study is the first to demonstrate distinct patterns of amygdala nuclei volume reductions in a well-powered sample of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. Volume differences in the basolateral complex (lateral, basal, and accessory basal nuclei), an integral part of the threat processing circuitry, were most prominent in schizophrenia.

    PMID: 33479754 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

  • White Matter Microstructural Differences between Hallucinating and Non-Hallucinating Schizophrenia Spectrum Patients.
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    White Matter Microstructural Differences between Hallucinating and Non-Hallucinating Schizophrenia Spectrum Patients.

    Diagnostics (Basel). 2021 Jan 19;11(1):

    Authors: Beresniewicz J, Craven AR, Hugdahl K, Løberg EM, Kroken RA, Johnsen E, Grüner R

    Abstract The relation between auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) and white matter has been studied, but results are still inconsistent. This inconsistency may be related to having only a single time-point of AVH assessment in many studies, not capturing that AVH severity fluctuates over time. In the current study, AVH fluctuations were captured by utilizing a longitudinal design and using repeated (Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale) PANSS questionnaire interviews over a 12 month period. We used a Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging (MR DTI) sequence and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to explore white matter differences between two subtypes of schizophrenia patients; 44 hallucinating (AVH+) and 13 non-hallucinating (AVH-), compared to 13 AVH- matched controls and 44 AVH+ matched controls. Additionally, we tested for hemispheric fractional anisotropy (FA) asymmetry between the groups. Significant widespread FA-value reduction was found in the AVH+ group in comparison to the AVH- group. Although not significant, the extracted FA-values for the control group were in between the two patient groups, for all clusters. We also found a significant difference in FA-asymmetry between the AVH+ and AVH- groups in two clusters, with significantly higher leftward asymmetry in the AVH- group. The current findings suggest a possible qualitative difference in white matter integrity between AVH+ and AVH- patients. Strengths and limitations of the study are discussed.

    PMID: 33477803 [PubMed]

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Published Feb. 25, 2014 11:43 AM - Last modified Feb. 8, 2019 10:31 AM