Norwegian version of this page

News

Published Oct. 22, 2019 10:34 AM

Their Report "Centralspindlin Recruits ALIX to the Midbody during Cytokinetic Abscission in Drosophila via a Mechanism Analogous to Virus Budding" uncovers parallels between ALIX recruitment during cytokinetic abscission in flies and virus budding in human cells and investigates the fine-tuned process involved in abscission, demonstrating that the centralspindlin complex emerges to play an ancestral role in recruiting the abscission machinery to the midbody

Image may contain: text, font, christmas eve, sky.
Published Sep. 19, 2019 12:15 PM

Ragnhild Eskeland from CanCell will take part in a popular science seminar coined "The Secrets of the Cells" in conjunction with "Science Days" at the University today (19/9, Litteraturhuset a 17.00), where she will present research on epigenetics and discuss why this gives us vital information about who we are, and what this may be used for. CanCell associate member Philippe Collas will also be presenting. 

If you want to attend there is still a few spaces available, please sign up here.

A graphic introduction to epigenetics can be viewed here (facebook).

For those of you that did not make it yesterday, there is a link to the seminar video here

Published May 9, 2019 1:36 PM

On May 8th CanCell invited four representative from Cancer Patient Interest groups to present their perspective on cancer and cancer research and to give feedback on the applications proposed by the Centre's scientists.

Published Dec. 5, 2018 1:09 PM

Harald Stenmark, head of the Cellular Membrane Dynamics group at the Department of Molecular Biology and director of the Center for Cancer Cell Reprogramming, is the leader of one of 25 research projects receiving a total of 100 million NOK from the Research Council of Norway and the Norwegian Agency for International Cooperation and Quality Enhancement in Higher Education (Diku), that run the program INTPART together.

Published Nov. 30, 2018 3:54 PM

The 2018 Dr. Ragnar Mørk's legacy prize went to Kaisa Haglund, head of the Cytokinesis in development and carcinogenesis project group at the Department of Molecular Cell Biology, for her outstanding research on cell division and cancer.

Published Aug. 7, 2018 3:11 PM

Binding of growth factors to their receptors is known to cause endocytosis and degradation of the receptors and their ligands by a mechanism that involves the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Failure of this mechanism can lead to cancer development. In a recent paper in Nature Communications, a team led by project leaders Eva Wenzel and Camilla Raiborg at Institute for Cancer Research and Centre for Cancer Cell Reprogramming has used advanced microscopy methods to reveal the dynamics of ESCRT recruitment and formation of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs) into which the receptor-ligand complexes are sorted for subsequent degradation.