NutriFrail

Diet and diet-modulated biological pathways as predictors for frailty among older adults.

Two elderly women eating together in a kitchen

Illustration: Colourbox

In order to enhance the knowledge of the frailty syndrome NutriFrail integrates epidemiological, clinical and basic nutritional research.

The overall objective of NutriFrail is to examine the impact of diet on the progress from healthy to growing frail (from fit to frail) with advancing years, in order to develop new strategies for dietary prevention or delay of frailty progress.

Nutrition and Frailty

Frailty is a geriatric related syndrome characterized by reduced physical function and increased risk of adverse health outcomes when exposed to a stressor. In NutriFrail, we study the impact of diet on risk of frailty by using data identifying dietary patterns related to frailty and examining the underlying diet-modulated biological pathways for increased risk of frailty associated with growing age.

We use data from two established cohorts (The Tromsø study and the Amarone study), and integrate traditional dietary intake data and recognized biomarkers of dietary intake with repeated longitudinal measurements of the transcriptome, applying novel methodologies. Further, we conduct complementary mice models to increase our understanding of the molecular pathways further.

Objectives

We aim to achieve a better understanding of diet’s impact on development of frailty in older adults.

We will achieve this by

  • identifying food, food patterns and biomarkers of dietary intake that can predict frailty in older adults on short and longer terms, taking anthropometry into account 
  • revealing the underlying diet-modulated biological pathways for increased risk of frailty, focusing on inflammatory patterns and molecular signatures based on gene expression

Financing

  • The Throne Holst Foundation
  • Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo

Start – finish

2019 - 2024

Cooperation

Published Aug. 25, 2020 2:06 PM - Last modified Aug. 25, 2020 3:14 PM